Dash Shaw

COMICS & ANIMATION
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NEW BOOKS: Cosplayers and Doctors,
New School, 3 New Stories, and New Jobs.

Previously: BodyWorld and Bottomless Belly Button.

Recent Animations: New School, Seraph, and Wheel of Fortune.

dash (dot) austin (dot) shaw (at) gmail (dot) com
A drawing of Florent Ruppert (of Ruppert & Mulot) from 2009. I found it randomly on my computer. I don’t know why I’d scanned it.

A drawing of Florent Ruppert (of Ruppert & Mulot) from 2009. I found it randomly on my computer. I don’t know why I’d scanned it.

From Cosplayers 2: Tezukon, out in July. This issue is an ode to comic/anime conventions, especially lightly attended ones that take place in remote hotels.

fantagraphics:

Dash Shaw is having a prolific year, with no signs of slowing down. His newest graphic novel, Doctors, is due this Fall. As with his other sci-fi-tinged stories, Shaw uses futuristic technology to explore human issues — this time, the ethics and emotional impact of interrupted mortality.
In our downloadable preview, an older woman with a seemingly idyllic life finds romance with a younger man — but her daughter appears with an unbelievable claim that her life as she knows it is not what it seems.
Doctors will be on call (in stores) in September (and available at SPX) and you can reserve your copy today.

fantagraphics:

Dash Shaw is having a prolific year, with no signs of slowing down. His newest graphic novel, Doctors, is due this Fall. As with his other sci-fi-tinged stories, Shaw uses futuristic technology to explore human issues — this time, the ethics and emotional impact of interrupted mortality.

In our downloadable preview, an older woman with a seemingly idyllic life finds romance with a younger man — but her daughter appears with an unbelievable claim that her life as she knows it is not what it seems.

Doctors will be on call (in stores) in September (and available at SPX) and you can reserve your copy today.

comicsworkbook:

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Comics Workbook Magazine #4 is available now from Copacetic Comics

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This issue features an interview with A. Degen by Graham Sigurdson, an essay on the Rothko Chapel (and minimalism in comics) by L. Nichols, a review of Andy Douglas Day’s Miss Hennipin by Sara Lautman, a translation of Barthélémy Schwartz’s 73 Notes on Comics from the French by Andrew White (with help from Schwartz), and new comic strips by Andrea Bjurst, Krystal DiFronzo, Inés Estrada, and Emma Louthan.

The cover was drawn by A. Degen.

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Limited quantities of #1, #2, and #3 are still available.

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Comics Workbook Magazine is put together by Andrew White (Editor / Wrangler), Zach Mason (Editorial Assistance + Design), and Frank Santoro (Editorial Supervision).

fantagraphics:

We just sent the files off to the printer for Dash Shaw's new graphic novel Doctors, so now’s a good time to show you the elegant all-new cover design by our capable newbie Keeli McCarthy. (If you liked the old version with the can-can line of doctors, don’t worry, that artwork is inside the book now.) A heady sci-fi tale that explores the human impact and ethical implications of advanced technology on an intimate level, in the vein of movies like Primer or Moon, Doctors posits a neurological afterlife and a machine that exploits it to revive the dead.
The first copies of the book will be available in September, and we will almost certainly have it in stock at SPX. To get your copy stat, pre-order today!

fantagraphics:

We just sent the files off to the printer for Dash Shaw's new graphic novel Doctors, so now’s a good time to show you the elegant all-new cover design by our capable newbie Keeli McCarthy. (If you liked the old version with the can-can line of doctors, don’t worry, that artwork is inside the book now.) A heady sci-fi tale that explores the human impact and ethical implications of advanced technology on an intimate level, in the vein of movies like Primer or Moon, Doctors posits a neurological afterlife and a machine that exploits it to revive the dead.

The first copies of the book will be available in September, and we will almost certainly have it in stock at SPX. To get your copy stat, pre-order today!

robotech-emissaries:

Dash Shaw screened the “very best episode” of Robotech as part of Comic Arts Brooklyn's November 2013 programming. I was intrigued by the cartoonist-animator's promo art for his evening of limited animation and curious about what Robotech episode he selected & why. Since no other news source (that I'm aware of) wrote about the event's specifics, I reached out to Shaw for an interview. He generously answered a few questions and, in the process, enlightened me to a possible reframing of Robotech's original production — as collage.

EhC: How do you define “limited animation”?

DASH SHAW: Animation that “limits” the number of drawings, usually because it’s a low-budget project. It’s the art of communicating a lot, through a little.

What Robotech episode did you screen at CAB? Why that episode?

Episode 17, “Phantasm.” I love the fast pace and delirious energy of the episode. It’s a long dream. It’s basically the most avant-garde episode, and it’s also completely fun. I’ve watched it many times. It has that great thing that film can do, which is someone imposing their sense of time on you. It reminds me of the Guy Maddin short "The Heart of the World" and the episode recaps that appear before shows like Lost, but this Robotech episode is 25 minutes long and is a total joyride the whole way through.

How did you discover Robotech? What attracted you then and what attracts you now?

I just rented it at some point. I’ve liked comics and cartoons my whole life. I never took any breaks from it. So the kinds of things I like now are very similar to the things I watched as a kid. But I don’t think I have any nostalgia for it in particular. I genuinely love the characters, the moral complexities of the story, and — as it’s presented in this program — it’s technical qualities, such as pace and movement. Mostly showing it in the context at CAB was about the technical aspects, especially the frantic, delirious pace of this particular episode. I played it right after an episode of a very fast-moving series I did for IFC called "The Unclothed Man in the 35th Century AD."

Collage is a technique you utilize in your work. The original 85-episode Robotech cartoon rearranges and draws connections between three separate series to create a unique multi-generational one. Is Robotech collage?

I hadn’t thought of that before. Usually I think of collage in comics and animation in a spatial sense. By arranging things on a page or a screen you’re drawing connections between things, or suggesting possibilities that might not have been apparent immediately. Like layering sound over an image creates a third thing. But that’s also true in stories. Interesting point.

You’ve been given eight pages in a Robotech comix anthology to tell any story in any way. What do you do?

I’m not interested. I want to tell stories about my own characters.

Dash’s animated short "Seraph" was a 2013 Sundance Film Festival award nominee. His Cosplayers one-shot came out in April 2014 and is available at quality comix shops & on comiXology.

Another frame from the animation I’m working on. The drawings are like 72% done right now.

Another frame from the animation I’m working on. The drawings are like 72% done right now.

Some of my favorite coloring books are the 1970s Planet of the Apes books. Coloring book drawings are designed to be clear and unalterable under a child’s stormy crayon scribbles. They’re like hurricane resistant beach houses. How can something so rigid sometimes be so moving? Chris Ware draws like a Do Not Walk sign, but I find him very emotional, while some artists draw in sensitive, expressive strokes that feel too self-involved to let me in. 

Chekhov wrote “If you wish to move your reader, write more coldly.” Jane Hirshfield’s poem In Praise of Coldness begins with this Chekhov quote, and she notes:

The point is not the coldness, but the way that a restraining coldness can in fact contain heat, can move the reader more than would a simple explosive outpouring. In art, in life, a certain coldness (the emotional distance of classical tragedy, the technical use of perspective in a Renaissance canvas, the capacity a person might have to step back sometimes from the pulse’s racing) allows, paradoxically, greater feeling, greater range, increase of compassion, but it cannot so dominate as to deny human feeling, human life. Heat alone is narcissism; coldness alone is fatal.